If it was just about money, we’d be broke

The professional athlete, expected to sign a contract for a lot of money… A collegiate athlete set a school record for her team… The coach about to be hired by…

ReputationThe sentence fragments above are similar to hundreds if not thousands of fragments from press releases, press conferences, blogs and sports television and radio interviews we hear most every day. The fragments are so dull, we can almost anticipate the next line.

For example:

The coach, about to be hired by State U, has been signed to a three year contract for $1.75 million a year plus the university has agreed to a bonus structure if State U makes it to the national championship. The professional athlete, expected to sign a contract for “a lot of money,” was rookie of the year last year and when his contract is re-negotiated, he should quadruple his salary. A collegiate athlete set a school record for her team; she will try out for the world cup and endorsement dollars are already pouring in along with movie offers.

If Chuck Gallagher sat down with any of those “individuals” or their coaches, agents, publicists or even teammates, and tried to convince them to put on a Sports Ethics class, or privately consult in regard to ethical behavior, they might express casual interest at best.

“Who needs someone teaching me, my team or my association about sports ethics? I’m (we’re) rich and powerful and you’re just a guy.”

We get it. We’ve heard it.

Let’s now look at the three “individuals” again.

The professional athlete, expected to sign a contract for a “lot of money” was arrested on suspicion of domestic abuse inside of a restaurant. He resisted arrest and when searched was found to be carrying an unlicensed, concealed weapon. He is expected to appear in court today. His team said they were aware of the charges.

A collegiate athlete set a school record for her team last night. She look three teammates out to a local bar and wrapped her SUV around a tree. Speed, alcohol and texting are all suspected in the crash. One of her teammates has died. The name is being withheld pending notification of the parents.

The coach, about to be hired by State U, is strongly suspected of sending two tweets to another coach “as a joke.” He was apparently new to Twitter. One of the tweets was racist, the other was anti-Semitic. He is denying the tweets came from him, but State U said it is aware of the issue and is investigating.

If Chuck Gallagher sat down with any of those “individuals,” or their coaches, agents, publicists or even teammates, they would be fools to not listen and learn. The issue is to get Chuck in front of them before they are about to make a bad choice.

Chuck made some bad choices many years ago. He does not speak to people as if he is a know-it-all. He knows exactly where the path of poor choices leads.

More than money

You see, the coach, the professional athlete and the collegiate record holder have lost something far more important than their ability to make money. They have lost their reputations. Money may or may not be fleeting. A reputation, well…

Far too often sports ethics is taught as an after-thought. Usually the instructor is a bored coach, an ex-athlete hanging around a program or a recycled HR specialist. They are not bad people, but they have little idea what it is like to lose reputations, family, professional standing, credentials and yes – money.

Chuck had no choice but to rebuild his life over several years, but serious athletes and coaches have little room for ethical error.

For the past 20 years Chuck has devoted his career to helping others avoid bad ethical choices leading to bad consequences. He is no-nonsense, sometimes blunt, sometimes funny, very compassionate and always very real.

Sports Ethics LLC makes presentations on sports ethics to athletes, teams, coaches and athletic associations. We also conduct private, confidential, one: one consultations.

It’s not about just the money. It never is. It’s about reputation. Guard it.

 

Sports Ethics, LLC

(828) 244-1400

www.sportsethics.com

 

 

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SportsEthics.com

Phone: (828) 244-1400
Fax: (866) 426-4118
Chuck Gallagher
3620 Pelham Road #305
Greenville, SC 29615